Biochar
CARBON NEGATIVE
Network Resources
Calendar
Photos
FAQs
Articles
Books
Videos
Database
Soil
Biochar
Biofuel
Burners
Research
Business
Websites
the Atlantic Recognition
Biochar Listserv
an international discussion

JOIN THIS YAHOO GROUP
PYROLYSIS
GASIFICATION
Network Contacts
US Biochar Initv
Northeast
Mid-Atlantic
McGaheysville VA
Southeast
Georgia
Mid-West
Rocky Mountain
Boulder CO
Northwest
Corvalis, OR
Seattle WA
West
Southwest
International
International Biochar Initiative
Canada
Ontario
United Kingdom
Italy
Japan
New Zealand
Albany Qigong
www.albanyqigong.com
Carbon-Negative Network
www.carbon-negative.us
Biochar Burners
can bucket barrel tank masonry mound mobile industrial
Bucket Burners
5-gallon size designs

The cheap, easy way to start making your own biochar to use in soil is a 5-gallon bucket. With simple tools and minimal skills, almost anyone can convert a 5-gallon metal can into a biochar burner. This processes batches that are suitable for small garden-scale test plots. A 5-gallon bucket is also a convenient batch size suitable to test small amounts of specific types of feedstocks to evaluate their production yield and suitability for soil use.
TLUD Stove Design
Micro-Gasification
what it is, why it works
Tom Reed, Paul Anderson, Paul Wever

In burning any biomass, gases and vapors called smoke are driven from the solid fuel, then burned. For over 100 years, scientists knew biomass combustion is cleaner when air is well mixed with combustible gases, instead of combustion occurring in the solid fuel. Creating combustible gases separate from gas combustion is a distinct characteristic of a true gasifier. Practical small scale gasification (micro-gasification) was achieved in 1985 when Dr. Thomas B. Reed created a Top-Lit Up-Draft (TLUD) stove.

A 5-gallon bucket is also a nice size for a household cookstove. All over the earth, every day every family needs food, and at least enough energy to cook food. indoor cooking. air pollution. smokeless combustion. making bichar to improve soil fertility and increase arable land to feed more people.

Simplest design is just a 5-gallon bucket with a hole for pyrolysis gases to be expelled. Load it, seal it, toss it in a fire.

But, we can get much more sophisticated and efficient. TLUD. Dr. Tom Read, National Renewable Energy Lab in Golden, Colorado. designs. adding small fan to boost output. projects.

Dr. Hugh McLaughlin, director of biocarbon research for Alterna Biocarbon. backyard biochar-maker from a turkey broaster and Cornelius kegs for soda syrup dispensers. makes nice standard 10 kilogram batches for biochar studies and characterization.

Paul Andersen, Dr. TLUD. CHIP designs. cooking grill makes biochar instaed of burning charcoal or propane. projects.

World Stove. designs. projects.

Dr. Bashkar Reddy, India.

webpage under construction

BIOCHAR:

the video
the story
the source
the miracle
the promise
1-Bucket Burner
Lonnie Avery , New York
simplest of the simple
Bucket & Barrel
Folke Gunther , Sweden
TLUD Cookstove
beginner guide
portable pyrolysis
Rocket Stove
+ 2-Barrel Retort
Jim Welch
Troy, NY
Biostove Project
Seattle Biochar
2-burner
Smokeburner Cookstove
Dr. Bhaskar Reddy , India
biochar & barbeque
TLUD Cooking Grill
Dr. Paul Anderson
, Illinois
award winner
TLUD Gasifier Stove
P. Mukundan
, India
Use of Charcoal
in
Agriculture & Forestry
in Japan

Dr. Makoto Ogawa
Osaka Institute of Technology


David Yarrow dyarrow@nycap.rr.com www.carbon-negative.us updated 12/15/2008